Last edited by Votaur
Tuesday, February 11, 2020 | History

12 edition of Plague and the Athenian Imagination found in the catalog.

Plague and the Athenian Imagination

Drama, History, and the Cult of Asclepius

by Robin Mitchell-Boyask

  • 87 Want to read
  • 2 Currently reading

Published by Cambridge University Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Literary studies: classical, early & medieval,
  • Literary Collections,
  • Ancient (Classical) Greek,
  • Literature: Classics,
  • Literary Collections / Ancient, Classical & Medieval,
  • Ancient, Classical & Medieval

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages224
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL10437996M
    ISBN 100521873452
    ISBN 109780521873451

    M-B argues that nosos and loimos, as words that described painful realities, evoked powerful emotions, especially in times of plague. When it fixed in the stomach, it upset it; and discharges of bile of every kind named by physicians ensued, accompanied by very great distress. Others again were seized with an entire loss of memory on their first recovery and did not know either themselves or their friends. Sources This article is a part of the About.

    Whole cities were exterminated, their men killed, their women and children enslaved. Neither were the physicians at first of any service, ignorant as they were of the proper way to treat it, but they died themselves the most thickly, as they visited the sick most often; nor did any human art succeed any better. Likewise, people started spending money indiscriminately. The Athenian Plague may have occurred thousands of years ago, but it still has relevance in our world today. In writing this book, M-B had to put aside two fundamental evidential difficulties. So they resolved to spend quickly and enjoy themselves, regarding their lives and riches as alike things of a day.

    The offerings we found consisted of common, even cheap, burial vessels; black-finished ones, some small red-figured, as well as white lekythoi oil flasks of the second half of the 5th century BC. M-B provides two incredibly useful tables of extant Greek tragedies, the year often, obviously, conjectured of their production, and the frequency of nosos in each play Now DNA collected from teeth in an ancient burial pit points to typhoid fever. This resulted in stricter laws dictating who can become an Athenian citizen, reducing both their number of potential soldiers and amount of political power, but also a decline in treatment and rights for metics in Athens. Thucydides' account clearly details the complete disappearance of social morals during the time of the plague


Share this book
You might also like
A journal of the proceedings of the Hon. House of Representatives, of the state of New-Hampshire

A journal of the proceedings of the Hon. House of Representatives, of the state of New-Hampshire

Sideline quarterback.

Sideline quarterback.

short guide to chemical literature.

short guide to chemical literature.

Art education for the exceptional child

Art education for the exceptional child

Reality and dream

Reality and dream

Kincaid of Red Butte

Kincaid of Red Butte

Tahiti

Tahiti

Pass it on!

Pass it on!

Step by step Indian cookbook

Step by step Indian cookbook

Client/server

Client/server

Plague and the Athenian Imagination book

The Plague of Athens: Epidemiology and Paleopathology. Even today, typhoid fever is a major health problem on a global scale. In this seventh chapter, M-B attempts to show a relationship between the cult of Asclepius especially the construction of the Asclepieion and Attic drama, despite the fact, as he acknowledges, that Asclepius himself only directly appears as a character in Aristophanes' Wealth.

Typhoid fever--transmitted by contaminated food or water--causes fever, rash and diarrhea, all closely matching Thucydides' account of the terrible plague.

The sacred places also in which they had quartered themselves were full of corpses of persons that had died there, just as they were; for as the disaster passed all bounds, men, not knowing what was to become of them, became utterly careless of everything, whether sacred or profane.

They would also do well to take an especially careful look at M-B's discussion of the play's use of nosos to refer not only in a physical way to the populace of Thebes, but also, by way of the plague under which Oedipus himself suffers, to a metaphorical but oh so real sickness of the body politic, a "live" metaphor which will play a central role in M-B's later chapters.

In proof of this, it was noticed that birds of this kind actually disappeared; they were not about the bodies, or indeed to be seen at all. While survival rates were very low, catching the plague once did provide immunity in the future.

Among other things which they remembered in their distress was, very naturally, the following verse which the old men said had long ago been uttered: A Dorian war shall come and with it death.

This I can the better do, as I had the disease myself, and watched its operation in the case of others. Sources This article is a part of the About. Skeptical readers might cringe at this approach's apparent circularity which M-B unashamedly acknowledgesbut this would be an arid criticism, and those who take a leap of faith will be rewarded by deepened insights into the play's complexities.

In particular, Thucydides mentioned that no one observed the customary funerary rites. Many from want of the proper appliances, through so many of their friends have died already, had recourse to the most shameless sepultures: sometimes getting the start of those who had raised a pile, they threw their own dead body upon the stranger's pyre and ignited it; sometimes they tossed the corpse which they were carrying on the top of another that was burning, and so went off.

It's unclear to me why Kousoulis et al. Their conclusion reads p. Externally the body was not very hot to the touch, nor pale in its appearance, but reddish, livid, and breaking out into small pustules and ulcers.

But if they passed this stage, and the disease descended further into the bowels, inducing a violent ulceration there accompanied by severe diarrhoea, this brought on a weakness which was generally fatal. The balance of power between citizens had changed due to many of the rich dying and their fortunes being inherited by remaining relatives of the lower class.

Others again were seized with an entire loss of memory on their first recovery and did not know either themselves or their friends. After the death of Pericles, Athens was led by a succession of leaders Thucydides described as incompetent or weak. In researchers discovered a mass grave containing at least bodies, including those of infants, deep beneath the Kerameikos cemetery in Athens.

He also said that birds and animals which preyed on the animals were affected and that doctors were among the most affected by it.

These are two leaps that M-B and just about every person who writes about tragedy takes, but most readers will be convinced that these are leaps worth taking. Nor was this the only form of lawless extravagance which owed its origin to the plague.

We should also be grateful to M-B for drawing our attention to the Rock of Asclepius, which has elicited precious few comments. It is said to have caused the death of one in every three people in Athens, and it is widely believed to have contributed to the decline and fall of classical Greece.

Many felt they would not live long enough to enjoy the fruits of wise investment, while some of the poor unexpectedly became wealthy by inheriting the property of their relatives. However, they have recently discovered molecular evidence, resulting from investigation and analysis of ancient DNA, that has identified the presence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi in victims of the Plague.Sep 15,  · No one knows what caused the Plague of Athens in the 5th century B.C.

One popular theory is Ebola—but to discover the source of an outbreak millennia after the fact, scientists need victims. Mitchell-Boyask's most recent book, Plague and the Athenian Imagination, expands Knox's observations to a wider array of tragedies (Euripides' Hippolytus, Heracles, Phoenissae; Sophocles' OT, Trachiniae, Philoctetes), to a greater variety of "political" events, and to a series of general investigations into the valence of words for sickness.

Apr 11,  · The Athenian plague occurred in B.C. during the Peloponnesian War, which was fought between Athens and Sparta from to Because of overcrowded wartime conditions in the city, the plague spread quickly, killing tens of atlasbowling.com victims.

His monograph Plague and the Athenian Imagination: Drama, History, and the Cult of Asclepius, was published by Cambridge University Press inand his study of the Eumenides of Aeschylus also appeared in with Duckworth.

The Plague in Athens

Future plans include books on the function of the horse in ancient epic and the problem of Ajax. The great plague of Athens that began in BCE had an enormous effect on the imagination of its literary artists and on the social imagination of the city as a whole.

In this book, Professor Mitchell-Boyask studies the impact of the plague on Athenian tragedy early in the s and argues for a significant relationship between drama and the development of the cult of the healing god Asclepius.

To the Editor: Langmuir et al. are to be congratulated on their analysis of the plague of Athens (October 17 issue).* The article draws attention to one of the fundamental works on Western civilization, which, unfortunately, is too often ignored outside college history atlasbowling.com by: 7.